Marines

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Major Gen. George Allen, director, Command, Control, Communications & Computers, Marine Corps Logistics Command, briefed more than 100 guests at the first USMC IT Day April 27, 2010. Industry executives met with the Corps’ information technology specialists to discuss what they can do to help the Corps achieve the goals set forth in the Vision and Strategy 2025, the principal strategic planning document of the Marine Corps.

Photo by Cpl. Priscilla Sneden

IT execs get low down on Corps’ innovation

27 Apr 2010 | Cpl. Priscilla Sneden

Several of the Corps’ top information technology leaders met with industry executives to discuss the future of operational technology at the first USMC IT Day April 27.

The event, hosted by the Quantico-Potomac Armed Forces Communication Electronics Association, discussed the role of the Marine Corps in a green and changing security IT environment and gave industry and small business owners an idea of how they can work with the Marine Corps to achieve victory in the war on terrorism.

Major Gen. George Allen, director, Command, Control, Communications & Computers, Marine Corps Logistics Command, briefed attendees on what they can do to help the Corps achieve the goals set forth by its Vision and Strategy 2025, the principal strategic planning document for the Corps.

C4’s objectives include the enhancement of the Marine Corps Enterprise Network and improving information assurance proficiency throughout the Corps, he said. However, the most critical objective is overall network connectivity throughout the battle space.

“[This would] set the conditions for rapid decision making and enhance situational awareness at the lowest level,” he said.

Maj Gen. select Timothy C. Hanifen, deputy commanding general Marine Corps Combat Development Command, spoke of the core competencies, outlined within the strategy, that provide the basis for the level of expertise and effectiveness of Marine Corps forces.

Everything the Corps develops is cross-referenced with the six core competencies to see how it can enhance the Corps’ fundamental contribution to the nation’s defense, Hanifen said.

Expeditionary green power, distributing services and information assurance are all high priorities for the future of the Corps, leaving an abundance of opportunities for the industry to assist the Corps in remaining the nation’s expeditionary “force of choice.”

The day provided networking opportunities for industry and Corps leadership. Guests included executives from General Dynamics, Adobe, Hewlett-Packard, Harris and Booz, Allen, Hamilton among others. Although topics ranged from the requirement process, acquisition cycle and objectives for the future, the main focus remained on the individual Marine.

“[This event] is about the Marine Corps and it is about industry but, at the end of the day it’s about the warfighter and winning the War,” said Mike Warlick, president Quantico-Potomac AFCEA chapter. “Information technology in the Marine Corps is focused on providing command, control and communication to support the warfighter. Without reliable information we would be incapable [of doing so].”
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