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Headquarters Marine Corps

Headquarters Marine Corps

HQMC News
Scuba Savior: 3d MLG Marine saves life in Okinawa By Cpl. Andrew Neumann | May 25, 2018
Fightertown Marines complete SAF training By Cpl. Ashley Phillips | May 25, 2018
It's a bird, it's a plane... | 3rd MLG, 3rd MarDiv team up to conduct MRZR air drop By Pfc. Mark Fike | May 25, 2018
In the Life of Marines: Pilot By Pfc. Kelcey Seymour | May 24, 2018
“Retreat, Hell!” Marines land in Okinawa By Lance Cpl. Matthew Navarra | May 22, 2018
Laying the groundwork for a multinational amphibious task force By Gunnery Sgt. Zachary Dyer | May 22, 2018
Into the danger zone: MCAS Miramar ARFF conducts HAZMAT exercise By Cpl. Jake McClung | May 21, 2018
Mission
Headquarters, U.S. Marine Corps (HQMC), located in Arlington, Virginia, consists of the Commandant of the Marine Corps and those staff agencies that advise and assist him in discharging his responsibilities prescribed by law and higher authority. The Commandant is directly responsible to the Secretary of the Navy for the total performance of the Marine Corps. This includes the administration, discipline, internal organization, training requirements, efficiency, and readiness of the service. The function, composition, and general duties of HQMC are defined in the United States Code, Title 10, Subtitle C, Part 1, Chapter 506 (Headquarters, Marine Corps).

The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the U.S. military responsible for providing power projection from the sea, utilizing the mobility of the U.S. Navy to rapidly deliver combined-arms task forces to global crises. Alongside the U.S. Navy, the Marine Corps operates under the United States Department of the Navy.

The Marine Corps, with authorized end strength of 202,100 active duty and 39,600 reserve Marines, is the smallest of the United States armed forces in the Department of Defense.
Marines TV
PALS 2018: Japan Self Defense Force Maj. Gen. Shinichi Aoki
Japan Self Defense Force Maj. Gen. Shinichi Aoki, commanding general, Amphibious Raid Deployment Brigade, speaks about the Pacific Amphibious Leaders Symposium (PALS) 2018 in Honolulu, Hawaii, May 23, 2018. The intent of PALS is to strengthen interoperability and working relationships between partner and allied militaries across a wide range of operations. Senior military leaders will use PALS as a platform to build upon already-established military-to-military relationships as well as hone their amphibious capabilities. (U.S. Marine Corps Video by Cpl. Justin Dixon)
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Medal of Honor, Master Chief Special Warfare Operator (SEAL) Britt Slabinski
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Medal of Honor, Master Chief Special Warfare Operator (SEAL) Britt Slabinski
Master Chief Special Warfare Operator (SEAL) Britt Slabinski: In the early morning of 4 March 2002, then-Senior Chief Slabinski led a reconnaissance team to its assigned area atop Takur Ghar, a 10,000-foot snow-covered mountain in Afghanistan. An enemy rocket-propelled grenade attack on the insertion helicopter caused Petty Officer Neil Roberts to fall onto the enemy-infested mountaintop below, and forced the damaged helicopter to crash land in the valley below. Fully aware of the risks, a numerically superior and well-entrenched enemy force, and approaching daylight, without hesitation Senior Chief Slabinski made the selfless and heroic decision to lead the remainder of his element on an immediate and daring rescue back to the mountaintop. Senior Chief Slabinski’s team, despite heavy incoming enemy fire, was subsequently successfully inserted on top of Takur Ghar. Senior Chief Slabinski, without regard for his own life, charged directly toward the enemy strongpoint. He and a teammate fearlessly assaulted and cleared one enemy bunker at close range. The enemy then unleashed a murderous hail of machine gun fire from a second hardened position twenty meters away. Senior Chief Slabinski exposed himself to enemy fire on three sides, then moved forward to silence the second position. With bullets piercing his clothing, he repeatedly charged into deadly fire to personally engage the enemy bunker with direct rifle fire, hand grenades and a grenade launcher on the surrounding enemy positions. Facing mounting casualties and low on ammunition, the situation became untenable. Senior Chief Slabinski skillfully maneuvered his team across open terrain, directing them out of effective enemy fire over the mountainside. Senior Chief Slabinski maneuvered his team to a more defensible position, directed danger-close air support on the enemy, requested reinforcements, and directed the medical care of his rapidly deteriorating wounded teammates, all while continuing to defend his position. When approaching daylight and accurate enemy mortar fire forced the team to maneuver further down the sheer mountainside, Senior Chief Slabinski carried a seriously wounded teammate through waist-deep snow, and led an arduous trek across precipitous terrain while calling in fires on enemies engaging the team from the surrounding ridges. Throughout the next 14 hours, he stabilized the casualties and continued the fight against the enemy until the mountain top could be secured and his team was extracted. His dedication, disregard for his own personal safety and tactical leadership make Master Chief Slabinski unquestionably deserving of this honor.