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NEW YORK -- Marines from 2nd Battalion, 25 Marine Regiment, Marine Forces Reserve, carried a Toys For Tots banner in the annual New York Veterans Day parade, here, Nov. 11. This year marks the 92st Anniversary of The New York City Veterans Day Parade. The parade is hosted by the United War Veterans Council, Inc. on behalf of the City of New York. It is the oldest and largest of its kind in the nation. Since November 11, 1919, the parade has provided an opportunity for Americans and International visitors to honor those who have served in the nation’s largest city. Sgt. Dakota Meyer, the recently awarded Marine Medal of Honor recipient, rode in the parade. Major Gen. Melvin Spiese, Deputy Commanding General, I Marine Expeditionary Force, represented the Marine Corps as one of the reviewing officials of the parade. The Toys For Tots program collects unopened toys each Christmas season for less fortunate children, see http://www.toysfortots.org/ for more information. (Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Randall A. Clinton / RELEASED)
NEW YORK -- Sgt. Dakota Meyer, the most recent Medal of Honor recipient, participated in the 92st Anniversary of The New York City Veterans Day Parade, here, Nov. 11. Meyer is the only living Marine to be awarded the Medal of Honor for actions since Vietnam. In 2009, he made multiple trips into an intense firefight to try and save members of his team. The parade is hosted by the United War Veterans Council, Inc. on behalf of the City of New York. It is the oldest and largest of its kind in the nation. Since November 11, 1919, the parade has provided an opportunity for Americans and International visitors to honor those who have served in the nation’s largest city. Major Gen. Melvin Spiese, Deputy Commanding General, I Marine Expeditionary Force, represented the Marine Corps as one of the reviewing officials of the parade. (Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Randall A. Clinton / RELEASED)
NEW YORK -- Marine veteran, Cpl. Aaron Mankin, participated in the 92st Anniversary of The New York City Veterans Day Parade, here, Nov. 11. Makin was  On May 11th, 2005, he was wounded when the 26-ton amphibious assault vehicle he was traveling in rolled over an improvised explosive device and was propelled 10 feet in the air. He has undergone more than 60 surgeries and acts as a spokemen for wounded service members. The parade is hosted by the United War Veterans Council, Inc. on behalf of the City of New York. It is the oldest and largest of its kind in the nation. Since November 11, 1919, the parade has provided an opportunity for Americans and International visitors to honor those who have served in the nation’s largest city. Sgt. Dakota Meyer, the recently awarded Marine Medal of Honor recipient, rode in the parade. Major Gen. Melvin Spiese, Deputy Commanding General, I Marine Expeditionary Force, represented the Marine Corps as one of the reviewing officials of the parade. (Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Randall A. Clinton / RELEASED)
NEW YORK -- A Marine firing detail from 6th Communications Battalion, Marine Forces Reserve, gave a rifle salute as part of the opening ceremony for the annual New York Veterans Day parade, here, Nov. 11. This year marks the 92st Anniversary of The New York City Veterans Day Parade. The parade is hosted by the United War Veterans Council, Inc. on behalf of the City of New York. It is the oldest and largest of its kind in the nation. Since November 11, 1919, the parade has provided an opportunity for Americans and International visitors to honor those who have served in the nation’s largest city. Sgt. Dakota Meyer, the recently awarded Marine Medal of Honor recipient, rode in the parade. Major Gen. Melvin Spiese, Deputy Commanding General, I Marine Expeditionary Force, represented the Marine Corps as one of the reviewing officials of the parade. (Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Randall A. Clinton / RELEASED)
NEW YORK -- Lt. Col. Richard J. Bordonaro, Instructor Inspector, 6th Communications Battalion, Marine Forces Reserve, and Sgt. Maj. George S. Sanchez salutes the grave site of the third Commandant of the United States Marine Corps, Franklin Wharton, Nov. 10. The Marines of 6th Communications Battalion placed a wreath at his headstone overlooking the busy streets of New York. Wharton served from 1798 to 1818. He was the first Commandant to occupy the Commandant's House, Marine Barracks, Washington. He was born in Philadelphia, and now rests at Trinity Church a few blocks away from Wall Street in Manhattan. (Marine Corps production by Sgt. Randall A. Clinton / RELEASED)
NEW YORK -- Lt. Col. Richard J. Bordonaro, Instructor Inspector, 6th Communications Battalion, Marine Forces Reserve, and Sgt. Maj. George S. Sanchez salutes the grave site of the third Commandant of the United States Marine Corps, Franklin Wharton, Nov. 10. The Marines of 6th Communications Battalion placed a wreath at his headstone overlooking the busy streets of New York. Wharton served from 1798 to 1818. He was the first Commandant to occupy the Commandant's House, Marine Barracks, Washington. He was born in Philadelphia, and now rests at Trinity Church a few blocks away from Wall Street in Manhattan. (Marine Corps production by Sgt. Randall A. Clinton / RELEASED)
NEW YORK -- A joint service color guard representing Marines, Coast Guardsmen, soldiers, airmen, and sailors appeared at The Soldiers’, Sailors’, Marines’, Coast Guard & Airmens’ Club’s Salute our Veterans ceremony in Times Square, here, Nov. 9. The SSMCA president, William McShane, told the gathered crowd that this was an opportunity to publicly thank the “brave, fearless people that put their lives on the line to protect our freedom.” The club was founded in 1919 to provide a respite for service members of the World War in Manhattan. By 1937 they were the only New York City institution dedicated to the welfare of enlisted troops. They have hosted more than 3 million service members in their midtown hotel.(Marine Corps production by Sgt. Randall. A. Clinton / RELEASED)
LIBERTY ISLAND, N.Y.  -- Two babies sleep holding American Flags during a naturalization ceremony for 125 new citizens, here, Oct. 28. Lance Cpl. Tomas Roginski was one of a few Marines, sailors, airmen, Coast Guardsmen and soldiers to join the naturalization ceremony with the group. The event was part of the day-long celebration of the 125th anniversary of the Statue of Liberty's dedication. The Department of Homeland Security rewards immigrants who join the military and serve honorably by exempting them from the normal residency requirements. Salazar told the new citizens, "You are represent what is best about America, because you represent what Americans should be celebrating and standing for around the world. We are a nation of diversity, and that diversity strengthens our country." Roginski immigrated to Brooklyn from Poland when he was a child. He currently serves in the Marine Corps with 6th Communication Battalion and is pursuing a degree in electrical engineering from the College of Staten Island. (Marine Corps production by Sgt. Randall. A. Clinton / RELEASED)
LIBERTY ISLAND, N.Y.  -- Lance Cpl. Tomas Roginski examines his citizenship paperwork. at the conclusion of his naturalization ceremony, here, Oct. 28. Roginski was one of a few Marines, sailors, airmen, Coast Guardsmen and soldiers to join the naturalization ceremony with the group. The event was part of the day-long celebration of the 125th anniversary of the Statue of Liberty's dedication. The Department of Homeland Security rewards immigrants who join the military and serve honorably by exempting them from the normal residency requirements. Salazar told the new citizens, "You are represent what is best about America, because you represent what Americans should be celebrating and standing for around the world. We are a nation of diversity, and that diversity strengthens our country." Roginski immigrated to Brooklyn from Poland when he was a child. He currently serves in the Marine Corps with 6th Communication Battalion and is pursuing a degree in electrical engineering from the College of Staten Island. (Marine Corps production by Sgt. Randall. A. Clinton / RELEASED)
LIBERTY ISLAND, N.Y.  -- Lance Cpl. Tomas Roginski reaches out to shake the hand of U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services director Alejandro Mayorkas at the conclusion of his naturalization ceremony, here, Oct. 28. Roginski was one of a few Marines, sailors, airmen, Coast Guardsmen and soldiers to join the naturalization ceremony with the group. The event was part of the day-long celebration of the 125th anniversary of the Statue of Liberty's dedication. The Department of Homeland Security rewards immigrants who join the military and serve honorably by exempting them from the normal residency requirements. Salazar told the new citizens, "You are represent what is best about America, because you represent what Americans should be celebrating and standing for around the world. We are a nation of diversity, and that diversity strengthens our country." Roginski immigrated to Brooklyn from Poland when he was a child. He currently serves in the Marine Corps with 6th Communication Battalion and is pursuing a degree in electrical engineering from the College of Staten Island. (Marine Corps production by Sgt. Randall. A. Clinton / RELEASED)
LIBERTY ISLAND, N.Y.  -- Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar  addressed 125 immigrants set to recieve their citizenship here, Oct. 28. Lance Cpl. Tomas Roginski was one of a few Marines, sailors, airmen, Coast Guardsmen and soldiers to join the naturalization ceremony with the group. The event was part of the day-long celebration of the 125th anniversary of the Statue of Liberty's dedication. The Department of Homeland Security rewards immigrants who join the military and serve honorably by exempting them from the normal residency requirements. Salazar told the new citizens, "You are represent what is best about America, because you represent what Americans should be celebrating and standing for around the world. We are a nation of diversity, and that diversity strengthens our country." Roginski immigrated to Brooklyn from Poland when he was a child. He currently serves in the Marine Corps with 6th Communication Battalion and is pursuing a degree in electrical engineering from the College of Staten Island. (Marine Corps production by Sgt. Randall. A. Clinton / RELEASED)
LIBERTY ISLAND, N.Y.  -- Lance Cpl. Tomas Roginski was one of a few Marines, sailors, airmen, Coast Guardsmen and soldiers to join a group of 125 immigrants in receiving their citizenship on Liberty Island, here, Oct. 28. The event was part of the day-long celebration of the 125th anniversary of the Statue of Liberty's dedication. The Department of Homeland Security rewards immigrants who join the military and serve honorably by exempting them from the normal residency requirements. Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar told the new citizens, "You are represent what is best about America, because you represent what Americans should be celebrating and standing for around the world. We are a nation of diversity, and that diversity strengthens our country." Roginski immigrated to Brooklyn from Poland when he was a child. He currently serves in the Marine Corps with 6th Communication Battalion and is pursuing a degree in electrical engineering from the College of Staten Island. (Marine Corps production by Sgt. Randall. A. Clinton / RELEASED)
LIBERTY ISLAND, N.Y.  -- Lance Cpl. Tomas Roginski was one of a few Marines, sailors, airmen, Coast Guardsmen and soldiers to join a group of 125 immigrants in receiving their citizenship on Liberty Island, here, Oct. 28. The event was part of the day-long celebration of the 125th anniversary of the Statue of Liberty's dedication. The Department of Homeland Security rewards immigrants who join the military and serve honorably by exempting them from the normal residency requirements. Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar told the new citizens, "You are represent what is best about America, because you represent what Americans should be celebrating and standing for around the world. We are a nation of diversity, and that diversity strengthens our country." Roginski immigrated to Brooklyn from Poland when he was a child. He currently serves in the Marine Corps with 6th Communication Battalion and is pursuing a degree in electrical engineering from the College of Staten Island. (Marine Corps production by Sgt. Randall. A. Clinton / RELEASED)
LIBERTY ISLAND, N.Y.  -- Lance Cpl. Tomas Roginski was one of a few Marines, sailors, airmen, Coast Guardsmen and soldiers to join a group of 125 immigrants in receiving their citizenship on Liberty Island, here, Oct. 28. The event was part of the day-long celebration of the 125th anniversary of the Statue of Liberty's dedication. The Department of Homeland Security rewards immigrants who join the military and serve honorably by exempting them from the normal residency requirements. Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar told the new citizens, "You are represent what is best about America, because you represent what Americans should be celebrating and standing for around the world. We are a nation of diversity, and that diversity strengthens our country." Roginski immigrated to Brooklyn from Poland when he was a child. He currently serves in the Marine Corps with 6th Communication Battalion and is pursuing a degree in electrical engineering from the College of Staten Island. (Marine Corps production by Sgt. Randall. A. Clinton / RELEASED)
LIBERTY ISLAND, N.Y.  -- Lance Cpl. Tomas Roginski was one of a few Marines, sailors, airmen, Coast Guardsmen and soldiers to join a group of 125 immigrants in receiving their citizenship on Liberty Island, here, Oct. 28. The event was part of the day-long celebration of the 125th anniversary of the Statue of Liberty's dedication. The Department of Homeland Security rewards immigrants who join the military and serve honorably by exempting them from the normal residency requirements. Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar told the new citizens, "You are represent what is best about America, because you represent what Americans should be celebrating and standing for around the world. We are a nation of diversity, and that diversity strengthens our country." Roginski immigrated to Brooklyn from Poland when he was a child. He currently serves in the Marine Corps with 6th Communication Battalion and is pursuing a degree in electrical engineering from the College of Staten Island. (Marine Corps production by Sgt. Randall. A. Clinton / RELEASED)
LIBERTY ISLAND, N.Y.  -- Lance Cpl. Tomas Roginski was one of a few Marines, sailors, airmen, Coast Guardsmen and soldiers to join a group of 125 immigrants in receiving their citizenship on Liberty Island, here, Oct. 28. The event was part of the day-long celebration of the 125th anniversary of the Statue of Liberty's dedication. The Department of Homeland Security rewards immigrants who join the military and serve honorably by exempting them from the normal residency requirements. Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar told the new citizens, "You are represent what is best about America, because you represent what Americans should be celebrating and standing for around the world. We are a nation of diversity, and that diversity strengthens our country." Roginski immigrated to Brooklyn from Poland when he was a child. He currently serves in the Marine Corps with 6th Communication Battalion and is pursuing a degree in electrical engineering from the College of Staten Island. (Marine Corps production by Sgt. Randall. A. Clinton / RELEASED)
Brigadier General (sel) Paul J. Kennedy
NEW YORK --  Sgt. Dakota Meyer, the first living Marine to be awarded the Medal of Honor for actions since Vietnam, signs a construction worker's hard hat while touring the National September 11 Memorial & Museum after speaking at a ceremony, here, Sept. 21. The two black bracelets he wears are inscribed with the names of the three Marines and sailor who died in the Sept. 9, 2009 battle referenced in Meyer's Medal of Honor citation. During his speech he told the audience of mostly veterans, firefighters, police and construction workers, "people have been calling me a hero a lot lately, but you are the real heroes... If this is what being a hero feels like, you can have it." For more information, visit www.dakotameyer.com. (Official Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Randall A. Clinton / RELEASED)
NEW YORK --  Sgt. Dakota Meyer, the first living Marine to be awarded the Medal of Honor for actions since Vietnam, toured the National September 11 Memorial & Museum after speaking at a ceremony, here, Sept. 21. During his speech he told the audience of mostly veterans, firefighters, police and construction workers, "people have been calling me a hero a lot lately, but you are the real heroes... If this is what being a hero feels like, you can have it." For more information, visit www.dakotameyer.com. (Official Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Randall A. Clinton / RELEASED)
NEW YORK --  Sgt. Dakota Meyer, the first living Marine to be awarded the Medal of Honor for actions since Vietnam, looks out a construction elevator during a tour of the Freedom Tower, Sept. 21. Meyer spoke at a ceremony at the National September 11 Memorial & Museum before touring the Freedom Tower. During his speech he told the audience of mostly veterans, firefighters, police and construction workers, "people have been calling me a hero a lot lately, but you are the real heroes... If this is what being a hero feels like, you can have it." For more information, visit www.dakotameyer.com. (Official Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Randall A. Clinton / RELEASED)