Marine Corps Expeditionary Energy Office

 

Marine Corps Expeditionary Energy Office

Headquarters Marine Corps

Expeditionary Energy
Expeditionary Energy or Operational Energy:  The energy required for training, moving, and sustaining military forces and weapons platforms for military operations. Includes energy used by tactical power systems, generators, and weapons platforms. (NDAA 2009)
Marine Corps Energy Capability Exercise
Marines with 3rd Battalion, 11th Marine Regiment, demonstrate the Ground Renewable Expeditionary Energy Network System (GREENS) and its ability to power the HIMARS Fire Control System during the Great Green Fleet Energy Capability Exercise at Camp Wilson aboard the Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center, Twentynine Palms, California, Dec. 6, 2016.
Marine Corps Operational Energy Capability Exercise
Marines with 3rd Battalion, 11th Marine Regiment, demonstrate the Ground Renewable Expeditionary Energy Network System (GREENS) and its ability to power the HIMARS Fire Control System during the Energy Capability Exercise at Camp Wilson aboard the Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center, Twentynine Palms, California, Dec. 6, 2016.
Casey Harsh, requirements analyst, Marine Corps Expeditionary Energy Office, explains the efforts the Marine Corps has developed to increase Operational Reach during the Energy Capability Exercise at Camp Wilson aboard the Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center, Twentynine Palms, California, Dec. 6, 2016.
Marine Corps Operational Energy Capability Exercise
Casey Harsh, requirements analyst, Marine Corps Expeditionary Energy Office, explains the efforts the Marine Corps has developed to increase Operational Reach during the Energy Capability Exercise at Camp Wilson aboard the Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center, Twentynine Palms, California, Dec. 6, 2016.
Capt. Michael Herendeen, science and technology analyst, Marine Corps Expeditionary Energy Office, explains the technologies the Marine Corps has developed to increase Operational Reach during the Energy Capability Exercise at Camp Wilson aboard the Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center, Twentynine Palms, California, Dec. 6, 2016.
Marine Corps Operational Energy Capability Exercise
Capt. Michael Herendeen, science and technology analyst, Marine Corps Expeditionary Energy Office, explains the technologies the Marine Corps has developed to increase Operational Reach during the Energy Capability Exercise at Camp Wilson aboard the Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center, Twentynine Palms, California, Dec. 6, 2016.
Lance Cpl. Marlon A. Hill, field artillery cannoneer, 3rd Battalion, 11th Marine Regiment, explains how more effective use of energy has increased capabilities during the Energy Capability Exercise at Camp Wilson aboard the Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center, Twentynine Palms, California, Dec. 6, 2016.
Marine Corps Operational Energy Capability Exercise
Lance Cpl. Marlon A. Hill, field artillery cannoneer, 3rd Battalion, 11th Marine Regiment, explains how more effective use of energy has increased capabilities during the Energy Capability Exercise at Camp Wilson aboard the Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center, Twentynine Palms, California, Dec. 6, 2016.
Happening Now
Marine Corps Energy Capability Exercise (Energy CAPEX)
  • The U.S. Marine Corps Expeditionary Energy Office (E2O) hosted an Energy Capability Exercise aboard MAGTF Training Command/Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center at Twentynine Palms’ Camp Wilson on Dec. 6.
  • The Energy CAPEX highlighted the criticality of energy capabilities to the path Marines take from the seabase to the battlefield – and demonstrated how the Marine Corps is using energy technologies, changing operational procedures, and exercising decision tools to improve combat capability and extend operational reach.
  • The event featured technologies that provide innovative means to generate energy, enable more effective energy usage, capture energy data on the battlefield, and aggregate this data to create actionable information. These systems will enable Marines to get more out of every gallon of fuel and every battery and extend the operational reach of the Force.
  • Read more: Marine Corps strives to be leaner, meaner, greener (DVIDS).
Intent
To change the way the Marine Corps employs energy and resources to increase combat effectiveness and reduce our need for logistics support.

- USMC Expeditionary Energy Strategy and Implementation Plan, March 2011
Mission
By 2025, we will deploy Marine Expeditionary Forces that can maneuver from the sea and sustain C4I and life support systems in place; the only liquid fuel needed will be for mobility systems which will be more efficient than systems are today.

- USMC Expeditionary Energy Strategy and Implementation Plan, March 2011